Annual report pursuant to Section 13 and 15(d)

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

v3.7.0.1
Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2016
Organization, Consolidation and Presentation of Financial Statements [Abstract]  
Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES
Consolidation Policy

The consolidated financial statements and accompanying data in this report include the accounts of AFI and its subsidiaries. All significant intercompany transactions have been eliminated from the Consolidated Financial Statements.

Change in Accounting Principle

During the fourth quarter of 2016, we changed our method of accounting for inventories in our Wood Flooring segment from the last-in, first-out ("LIFO") method to the first-in, first-out ("FIFO") method. As a result of this accounting change, inventories, Net AWI investment, deferred income taxes, net income (loss), basic earnings (loss) per share and diluted earnings (loss) per share, among other reported amounts, have been retrospectively changed.

Use of Estimates

We prepare our financial statements in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles ("GAAP"), which requires management to make estimates and assumptions. These estimates and assumptions affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses. When preparing an estimate, management determines the amount based upon the consideration of relevant internal and external information. Actual results may differ from these estimates.

Reclassifications

Certain amounts in the prior year’s Consolidated Financial Statements and related notes and schedule thereto have been recast to conform to the 2016 presentation. Specifically, we have aggregated certain line items in the Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows that were previously presented in more detail.

Revenue Recognition 

We recognize revenue from the sale of products when persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, title and risk of loss transfers to the customers, prices are fixed and determinable, and it is reasonably assured the related accounts receivable is collectible. Our standard sales terms are primarily Free On Board (“FOB”) shipping point. Our products are sold with normal and customary return provisions. Sales discounts are deducted immediately from the sales invoice. Provisions, which are recorded as a reduction of revenue, are made for the estimated cost of rebates, promotional programs and warranties. We defer recognizing revenue if special sales agreements, established at the time of sale, warrant this treatment.

Sales Incentives

Sales incentives to customers are reflected as a reduction of net sales.

Shipping and Handling Costs

Shipping and handling costs are reflected as a component of cost of goods sold.

Advertising Costs

We recognize advertising expenses as they are incurred.



NOTE 2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (continued)
Pension and Postretirement Benefits

We have benefit plans that provide for pension, medical and life insurance benefits to certain eligible employees when they retire from active service. The cost of benefits provided by these plans is recorded in the periods in which employees provide service. The cost of plan amendments that provide for benefits already earned by plan participants is amortized over the expected future working lifetime or the life expectancy of plan participants. A market-related value of plan assets methodology is utilized in the calculation of expected return on assets. The methodology recognizes gains and losses on long duration bonds immediately, while gains and losses on other assets are recognized in the calculation over a five-year period. We use a December 31 measurement date for our pension and postretirement benefit plans.

Taxes

For the periods ending prior to and on March 31, 2016, operations of certain businesses included in our Consolidated Financial Statements are divisions of legal entities included in AWI’s consolidated U.S. federal and state income tax returns, or tax returns of non-U.S. subsidiaries of AWI. The provision for income taxes and related balance sheet accounts of such entities have been prepared and presented in the Consolidated Financial Statements based on a separate return basis. Differences between our separate return income tax provision and cash flows attributable to income taxes for businesses that were divisions of legal entities have been recognized as capital contributions from, or dividends to, AWI within Net AWI investment.

The provision for income taxes has been determined using the asset and liability approach of accounting for income taxes to reflect the expected future tax consequences of events recognized in the financial statements. Deferred income tax assets and liabilities are recognized by applying enacted tax rates to temporary differences that exist as of the balance sheet date which result from differences in the timing of reported taxable income between tax and financial reporting.

We reduce the carrying amounts of deferred tax assets by a valuation allowance if, based on the available evidence, it is more likely than not that such assets will not be realized. The need to establish valuation allowances for deferred tax assets is assessed quarterly. In assessing the requirement for, and amount of, a valuation allowance in accordance with the more likely than not standard for all periods, we give appropriate consideration to all positive and negative evidence related to the realization of the deferred tax assets. This assessment considers, among other matters, the nature, frequency and severity of current and cumulative losses, forecasts of future profitability and foreign source income, the duration of statutory carryforward periods, and our experience with operating loss and tax credit carryforward expirations. A history of cumulative losses is a significant piece of negative evidence used in our assessment. If a history of cumulative
losses is incurred for a tax jurisdiction, forecasts of future profitability are not used as positive evidence related to the realization of the deferred tax assets in the assessment.

We recognize the tax benefits of an uncertain tax position only if those benefits are more likely than not to be sustained based on existing tax law. Additionally, we establish a reserve for tax positions that are more likely than not to be sustained based on existing tax law, but uncertain in the ultimate benefit to be sustained upon examination by the relevant taxing authorities. Unrecognized tax benefits are subsequently recognized at the time the more likely than not recognition threshold is met, the tax matter is effectively settled or the statute of limitations for the relevant taxing authority to examine and challenge the tax position has expired, whichever is earlier.

We account for all interest and penalties on uncertain income tax positions as income tax expense.

Taxes collected from customers and remitted to governmental authorities are reported on a net basis.




NOTE 2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (continued)
Earnings per Share

Basic earnings per share is computed by dividing the earnings attributable to common shares by the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding during the period. Diluted earnings per share reflects the potential dilution of securities that could share in the earnings.

Cash and Cash Equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents include cash on hand and short-term investments that have maturities of three months or less when purchased.

Receivables

We sell the vast majority of our products to select, pre-approved customers using customary trade terms that allow for payment in the future. Customer trade receivables and miscellaneous receivables (which include supply-related rebates and other short-term customer notes), net of allowances for doubtful accounts, customer credits and warranties are reported in accounts and notes receivable on a net basis. Cash flows from the collection of current receivables are classified as operating cash flows on the Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows.

We establish credit-worthiness prior to extending credit. We estimate the recoverability of receivables each period. This estimate is based upon new information in the period, which can include the review of available financial statements and forecasts, as well as discussions with legal counsel and the management of the debtor company. We provide allowances as events occur which impact the collectability of the receivable. Account balances are charged off against the allowance when the potential for recovery is considered remote. We do not have any off-balance-sheet credit exposure related to our customers.

Inventories

Inventories are valued at the lower of cost or market. During the fourth quarter of 2016, we changed the method of accounting for our Wood Flooring segment inventories from the LIFO method to the FIFO method. We use the LIFO method of accounting for our U.S. Resilient Flooring segment inventories.

We believe the FIFO method of accounting for inventory costs is preferable for the Wood Flooring segment inventories because it provides a better measure of the current cost of inventory and provides a better match of manufacturing costs with revenues considering the volatility of lumber prices and the long production cycle time.















NOTE 2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (continued)
Comparative financial statements of prior years have been adjusted to apply the FIFO method to our Wood Flooring segment retrospectively. The following financial statements for fiscal years 2016, 2015 and 2014 were affected by the change in accounting principle:

Income Statements
 
Year Ended December 31, 2016
 
As Computed under LIFO
 
As Reported
 
Effect of Change
Cost of goods sold
$
973.4

 
$
963.1

 
$
(10.3
)
Income tax expense
1.5

 
4.1

 
2.6

Income (loss) from continuing operations
(0.2
)
 
7.5

 
7.7

Net income
1.5

 
9.2

 
7.7


 
Year Ended December 31, 2015
 
As Computed under LIFO
 
As Adjusted
 
Effect of Change
Cost of goods sold
$
961.1

 
$
993.0

 
$
31.9

Income tax expense (benefit)
5.3

 
(7.3
)
 
(12.6
)
Income (loss) from continuing operations
9.0

 
(10.3
)
 
(19.3
)
Net income
48.9

 
29.6

 
(19.3
)
 
Year Ended December 31, 2014
 
As Computed under LIFO
 
As Adjusted
 
Effect of Change
Cost of goods sold
$
1,021.7

 
$
1,010.7

 
$
(11.0
)
Income tax expense
3.6

 
7.9

 
4.3

Income from continuing operations
2.8

 
9.5

 
6.7

Net (loss)
(37.2
)
 
(30.5
)
 
6.7

















NOTE 2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (continued)
Balance Sheets
 
December 31, 2016
 
As Computed under LIFO
 
As Reported
 
Effect of Change
Assets
 
 
 
 
 
Inventories, net
$
251.6

 
$
272.1

 
$
20.5

Income tax receivable
4.7

 
2.4

 
(2.3
)
Deferred income taxes, noncurrent
5.3

 
4.5

 
(0.8
)
Liabilities
 
 
 
 
 
Deferred income taxes, noncurrent
3.8

 
8.4

 
4.6

Stockholders' equity
 
 
 
 
 
Additional paid-in capital
666.4

 
673.3

 
6.9

Retained earnings
4.1

 
10.0

 
5.9


 
December 31, 2015
 
As Computed under LIFO
 
As Adjusted
 
Effect of Change
Assets
 
 
 
 
 
Inventories, net
$
242.8

 
$
253.0

 
$
10.2

Deferred income taxes, current
3.0

 

 
(3.0
)
Liabilities
 
 
 
 
 
Deferred income taxes, current
0.3

 
1.4

 
1.1

Stockholders' equity
 
 
 
 
 
Net AWI investment
615.9

 
622.0

 
6.1



As a result of the accounting change, Net AWI investment as of January 1, 2014 increased from $534.3 million, as originally reported using the LIFO method, to $553.1 million using the FIFO method.

Statements of Cash Flows
 
Year Ended December 31, 2016
 
As Computed under LIFO
 
As Reported
 
Effect of Change
Net income
$
1.5

 
$
9.2

 
$
7.7

Changes in operating assets and liabilities
(6.8
)
 
(14.8
)
 
(8.0
)
Deferred income taxes
(5.5
)
 
(5.2
)
 
0.3




NOTE 2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (continued)
 
Year Ended December 31, 2015
 
As Computed under LIFO
 
As Adjusted
 
Effect of Change
Net income
$
48.9

 
$
29.6

 
$
(19.3
)
Changes in operating assets and liabilities
12.5

 
44.4

 
31.9

Deferred income taxes
(43.4
)
 
(56.0
)
 
(12.6
)

 
Year Ended December 31, 2014
 
As Computed under LIFO
 
As Adjusted
 
Effect of Change
Net (loss)
$
(37.2
)
 
$
(30.5
)
 
$
6.7

Changes in operating assets and liabilities
(56.3
)
 
(67.4
)
 
(11.1
)
Deferred income taxes
26.0

 
30.4

 
4.4



Property Plant and Equipment

Property, plant and equipment is recorded at cost reduced by accumulated depreciation. Depreciation expense is recognized on a straight-line basis over assets’ estimated useful lives. Machinery and equipment includes manufacturing equipment (depreciated over 3 to 15 years), computer equipment (depreciated over 3 to 5 years) and office furniture and equipment (depreciated over 5 to 7 years). Within manufacturing equipment, assets that are subject to accelerated obsolescence or wear, such as tooling and engraving equipment, are depreciated over shorter periods (3 to 7 years). Heavy production equipment, such as conveyors, kilns and mixers, are depreciated over longer periods (10 to 15 years). Buildings are depreciated over 15 to 30 years, depending on factors such as type of construction and use. Computer software is amortized over 3 to 7 years.

Property, plant and equipment is tested for impairment when indicators of impairment exist, such as operating losses and/or negative cash flows. If an evaluation of the undiscounted future cash flows generated by the asset indicates impairment, the asset is written down to its estimated fair value, which is based on its discounted future cash flows. Impairments of assets related to our manufacturing operations are recorded in cost of goods sold.

When assets are disposed or retired, their costs and related depreciation are removed from the financial statements, and any resulting gains or losses normally are reflected in cost of goods sold or selling, general and administrative (“SG&A”) expenses, depending on the nature of the asset.

Asset Retirement Obligations

We recognize the fair value of obligations associated with the retirement of tangible long-lived assets in the period in which they are incurred. Upon initial recognition of a liability, the discounted cost is capitalized as part of the related long-lived asset and depreciated over the corresponding asset’s useful life. Over time, accretion of the liability is recognized as an operating expense to reflect the change in the liability’s present value.

Intangible Assets

Our amortizable intangible assets are primarily land use rights and developed technology. We review significant amortizable intangible assets for impairment when indicators of impairment exist, such as operating losses and/or negative cash flows. If an evaluation of the undiscounted future cash flows generated by the asset indicates impairment,
NOTE 2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (continued)
the asset is written down to its estimated fair value, which is based on its discounted future cash flows. The principal assumption used in these impairment tests is future cash flows, which are derived from those used in our operating plan and strategic planning processes.

Our non-amortizable intangible assets are primarily trademarks and brand names, with Bruce representing the primary asset, all of which are integral to our corporate identity and expected to contribute indefinitely to our corporate cash flows. Accordingly, they have been assigned an indefinite life. We conduct our annual impairment test for non-amortizable intangible assets during the fourth quarter, although we would conduct interim impairment tests if events or circumstances indicated potential impairment.
 
The principal assumptions used in our impairment tests for non-amortizable intangible assets include revenue growth rate, discount rate and royalty rate. Revenue growth rates are derived from those used in our operating plan and strategic planning processes. The discount rate assumption is calculated based upon an estimated weighted average cost of capital which reflects the overall level of inherent risk and the rate of return a market participant would expect to achieve. The royalty rate assumption represents the estimated contribution of the intangible asset to the overall profits of the reporting unit. Methodologies used for valuing our non-amortizable intangible assets did not change from prior periods.

Foreign Currency Transactions

Assets and liabilities of our subsidiaries operating outside the U.S. which account in a functional currency other than U.S. dollars are translated using the period-end exchange rate. Revenues and expenses are translated at exchange rates effective during each month. Foreign currency translation gains or losses are included as a component of accumulated other comprehensive income within equity. Gains or losses on foreign currency transactions are recognized through the statement of operations.

Product Warranties

A provision for estimated future product warranty cost is recorded when products are shipped to our customer and revenue is recognized. Our estimate of future costs to satisfy warranty obligations is primarily based on historical trends and, if believed to be significantly different from historical trends, estimates of future costs. Costs to satisfy customer accommodation repairs or replacements made at the sole discretion of AFI are recorded as a component of warranty expense when such customer accommodations are made.

Stock-Based Employee Compensation

We issue stock-based compensation to certain employees and non-employee directors in different forms of benefits, including performance stock awards ("PSAs"), performance stock units ("PSUs"), and restricted stock units ("RSUs"). We record stock-based compensation expense based on estimated grant-date fair value. The expense is reflected as a component of SG&A expense on our Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income (Loss). Stock-based compensation expense includes an estimate for forfeitures and anticipated achievement levels and is generally recognized on a straight-line basis over the vesting period for the entire award.

Net AWI Investment

Net AWI investment on the Consolidated Balance Sheets represented AWI’s net investment in AFI. The Consolidated Statements of Stockholders' Equity include net cash transfers and other property transfers between AWI and AFI. The Net AWI investment balance included assets and liabilities incurred by AWI on behalf of AFI such as accrued liabilities related to corporate allocations including administrative expenses for legal, accounting, treasury, information technology, human resources and other services. Other assets and liabilities recorded by AWI, whose related income and expense had been allocated to AFI, were also included in Net AWI investment.
NOTE 2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (continued)
All intercompany transactions effected through Net AWI investment in the accompanying Consolidated Balance Sheets were considered cash receipts and payments and are reflected in financing activities in the accompanying Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows.
The impact of the separation activities on equity is reflected in net transfers from AWI and distribution paid to AWI on the Consolidated Statements of Stockholders' Equity and the Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows. The components on the Consolidated Statements of Stockholders' Equity and the Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows were as follows:
 
 
Year Ended
December 31, 2016
 
 
Consolidated Statements of Stockholders' Equity
 
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows - Financing Activities
 
 
Net transfers from AWI for the three months prior to separation
$
53.6

 
$
53.6

 
Net transfers (to) from AWI upon separation
(11.2
)
 
9.0

 
Other activity concurrent with separation

 
(7.0
)
 
 
42.4

 
55.6

 
Cash distribution paid to AWI upon separation
(50.0
)
 
(50.0
)
 
Net transfers (to) from AWI
$
(7.6
)
 
$
5.6


Recently Adopted Accounting Standards

In April 2015, the Financial Accounting Standards Board ("FASB") issued Accounting Standards Update ("ASU") 2015-03, “Simplifying the Presentation of Debt Issuance Costs." This update amends existing guidance to require the presentation of debt issuance costs on the balance sheet as a deduction from the carrying amount of the related debt liability instead of a deferred charge.  In August 2015, the FASB issued ASU 2015-15, “Presentation and Subsequent Measurement of Debt Issuance Costs Associated with Line-of-Credit Arrangements,” which was issued to address the presentation and subsequent measurement of debt issuance costs related to line-of-credit arrangements. This update allows an entity to defer and present debt issuance costs as an asset and subsequently amortize the deferred debt issuance costs ratably over the term of the line-of-credit arrangement. ASU 2015-03 and 2015-15 were effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2015. We adopted ASU 2015-15 effective April 1, 2016. There was no impact on our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows as a result of the adoption of this guidance.

In April 2015, the FASB issued ASU 2015-05, “Customer’s Accounting for Fees Paid in a Cloud Computing Arrangement” which provides guidance to determine when a customer’s fees paid in a cloud computing arrangement include a software license. If a cloud computing arrangement includes a software license, the customer should account for the software license element of the arrangement consistent with the acquisition of other software licenses. If the arrangement does not include a software license, the customer should account for a cloud computing arrangement as a service contract. The new guidance was effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2015. There was no impact on our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows as a result of the adoption of this guidance.

In November 2015, the FASB issued ASU 2015-17, "Balance Sheet Classification of Deferred Taxes." The guidance requires entities with a classified balance sheet to present all deferred tax assets and liabilities as noncurrent. The new guidance may be applied retrospectively or prospectively and is effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2016, but early adoption is permitted. We adopted this standard effective April 1, 2016; the balance

NOTE 2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (continued)
sheet as of December 31, 2015 was not retrospectively adjusted. Adoption of this standard did not impact our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.
In March 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-09, "Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting." The guidance simplifies accounting for share-based payments, most notably by requiring all excess tax benefits and tax deficiencies to be recorded as income tax benefits or expense on the statement of operations and by allowing entities to elect to recognize forfeitures of awards when they occur. The new guidance may be applied retrospectively or prospectively and is effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2016, but early adoption is permitted. We adopted this guidance prospectively effective April 1, 2016. We elected to estimate forfeitures based on historical forfeiture activity, when appropriate. Adoption did not have a material impact on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.
Recently Issued Accounting Standards
In May 2014, the FASB issued ASU 2014-09, "Revenue from Contracts with Customers." The guidance requires an entity to recognize the amount of revenue to which it expects to be entitled for the transfer of promised goods or services to a customer. The ASU will replace most existing revenue recognition guidance in GAAP when it becomes effective. In August 2015, the FASB issued ASU 2015-14, "Revenue from Contracts with Customers: Deferral of the Effective Date" which defers the effective date for ASU 2014-09 by one year. In March 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-08, "Principal versus Agent Considerations (Reporting Gross versus Net)," which clarifies the implementation guidance in ASU 2014-09 relating to principal versus agent considerations. In April 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-10, "Identifying Performance Obligations and Licensing," which clarifies guidance related to the impact of goods and services on a performance obligation and timing and pattern of recognition issues related to intellectual property contracts. In May 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-12, "Narrow-Scope Improvements and Practical Expedients," which clarify certain narrow provisions of ASU 2014-09. These ASUs are effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2017, but early adoption is permitted. We have not selected a transition method and are currently evaluating the impact these ASUs will have on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.
In July 2015, the FASB issued ASU 2015-11, "Simplifying the Measurement of Inventory." The guidance requires that inventory that is measured on a FIFO or average cost basis to be measured at lower of cost and net realizable value, as opposed to the lower of cost or market. For inventory that is measured under the LIFO basis or the retail recovery method, there is no change to current measurement requirements. This new guidance must be applied prospectively and is effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2016, but early adoption is permitted. We are currently evaluating the impact the adoption of this standard would have on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.
In January 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-01, "Recognition and Measurement of Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities." The guidance addresses certain aspects of recognition, measurement, presentation, and disclosure of financial instruments. Most notably, this new guidance requires equity investments (except those accounted for under the equity method of accounting or those that result in consolidation of the investee) to be measured at fair value with changes in fair value recognized in net income. This new guidance is effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2017. We are currently evaluating the impact the adoption of this standard would have on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.
In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-02, "Leases." The guidance amends accounting for leases, most notably by requiring a lessee to recognize the assets and liabilities that arise from a lease agreement. Specifically, this new guidance will require lessees to recognize a liability to make lease payments and a right-of-use asset representing its right to use the underlying asset for the lease term, with limited exceptions. This new guidance is effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2018 and must be adopted under a modified retrospective basis. We
are currently evaluating the impact the adoption of this standard would have on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.
NOTE 2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (continued)
In June 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-13, "Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments." The guidance requires immediate recognition of estimated credit losses that are expected to occur over the remaining life of many financial assets. This new guidance is effective for annual and interim periods in fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, but early adoption is permitted for annual and interim periods in fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018. We are currently evaluating the impact the adoption of this standard would have on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

In October 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-16, "Intra-Entity Transfers of Assets Other Than Inventory." The guidance requires entities to recognize income tax consequences of many intercompany asset transfers other than inventory, at the transaction date. This new guidance is effective for annual and interim periods in fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017. Early adoption is permitted but only at the beginning of an annual period. We are currently evaluating the impact the adoption of this standard would have on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Subsequent Events

We have evaluated subsequent events for potential recognition and disclosure through the date the Consolidated Financial Statements included in the Form 10-K were issued.