Annual report pursuant to Section 13 and 15(d)

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

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Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020
Organization, Consolidation and Presentation of Financial Statements [Abstract]  
Summary of Significant Accounting Policies SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES
Consolidation Policy
The Consolidated Financial Statements and accompanying data in this report include the accounts of AFI and its subsidiaries. Intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated from the Consolidated Financial Statements.

Use of Estimates
We prepare our financial statements in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles ("U.S. GAAP"), which requires management to make estimates and assumptions. These estimates and assumptions affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses. When preparing an estimate, management determines the amount based upon the consideration of relevant internal and external information. Actual results may differ from these estimates.

Revenue Recognition 
We recognize revenue when control of the promised goods is transferred to our customers, in an amount that reflects the consideration we expect to be entitled to in exchange for those goods.

Our primary performance obligation to our customers is the delivery of flooring products pursuant to purchase orders. Control of the products we sell generally transfers to our customers at the point in time when the goods are shipped. Our standard sales terms are primarily free-on-board shipping point. Our typical payment terms are 30 days and our sales arrangements do not contain any significant financing component for our customers. Our customer arrangements do not generate contract assets or liabilities that are material to the Consolidated Financial Statements.

Each purchase order sets forth the transaction price for the products purchased under that arrangement. Some customer arrangements include variable consideration, such as volume rebates, some of which depend upon our customers meeting specified performance criteria, such as a purchasing level over a period of time. We use judgment to estimate the most likely amount of variable consideration at each reporting date.

Costs to obtain a contract are capitalized and amortized over the life of the related contract when the incremental costs directly relate to a specific contract, generates or enhances resources of the company that will be used to satisfy performance of the terms of the contract and the cost are expected to be recovered from the customer. During the fourth quarter of 2020 we capitalized $1.1 million of costs to obtain a contract, related to a single new arrangement, which will be amortized over the three year contractual agreement.

We disaggregate revenue based on customer geography as this category represents the most appropriate depiction of how the nature, timing and uncertainty of revenues and cash flows are impacted by economic factors. See Note 3, Nature of Operations, to the Consolidated Financial Statements for our revenues disaggregated by geography.

Warranties - We provide our customers with a product warranty that provides assurance that the products we sell meet standard specifications and are free of defects. We maintain a reserve for claims and related costs based on historical experience and periodically adjusts these provisions to reflect actual experience. See Note 9, Accounts and Notes Receivable, to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information.

Sales Incentives - Sales incentives to customers are reflected as a reduction of net sales.

Shipping and Handling Costs - We treat shipping and handling that occurs after customers obtain control of the products as a fulfillment activity and not as a promised service. Shipping and handling costs are reflected as a component of cost of goods sold.

Taxes - Taxes collected from customers and remitted to governmental authorities are reported on a net basis.

Advertising Costs
We recognize advertising expenses as they are incurred.
Pension and Postretirement Benefits
We have benefit plans that provide for pension, medical and life insurance benefits to certain eligible employees when they retire from active service. The cost of plan amendments that provide for benefits already earned by plan participants is amortized over the expected future working lifetime or the life expectancy of plan participants. A market-related value of plan assets methodology is utilized in the calculation of expected return on assets. The methodology recognizes gains and losses on long duration bonds immediately, while gains and losses on other assets are recognized in the calculation over a five-year period. We use a December 31 measurement date for our pension and postretirement benefit plans. See Note 15, Pension and Other Postretirement Benefit Programs, to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information.

Taxes
The provision for income taxes has been determined using the asset and liability approach of accounting for income taxes to reflect the expected future tax consequences of events recognized in the Consolidated Financial Statements. Deferred income tax assets and liabilities are recognized by applying enacted tax rates to temporary differences that exist as of the balance sheet date which result from differences in the timing of reported taxable income between tax and financial reporting.

We reduce the carrying amounts of deferred tax assets by a valuation allowance if, based on the available evidence, it is more likely than not that such assets will not be realized. The need to establish valuation allowances for deferred tax assets is assessed quarterly. In assessing the requirement for, and amount of, a valuation allowance in accordance with the more likely than not standard for all periods, we give appropriate consideration to all positive and negative evidence related to the realization of the deferred tax assets. This assessment considers, among other matters, the nature, frequency and severity of current and cumulative losses, forecasts of future profitability and foreign source income, the duration of statutory carryforward periods and our experience with operating loss and tax credit carryforward expirations. A history of cumulative losses is a significant piece of negative evidence used in our assessment. If a history of cumulative losses is incurred for a tax jurisdiction, forecasts of future profitability are not used as positive evidence related to the realization of the deferred tax assets in the assessment.

We recognize the tax benefits of an uncertain tax position only if those benefits are more likely than not to be sustained based on existing tax law. Additionally, we establish a reserve for tax positions that are more likely than not to be sustained based on existing tax law, but uncertain in the ultimate benefit to be sustained upon examination by the relevant taxing authorities.  Unrecognized tax benefits are subsequently recognized at the time the more likely than not recognition threshold is met, the tax matter is effectively settled or the statute of limitations for the relevant taxing authority to examine and challenge the tax position has expired, whichever is earlier.

We account for all interest and penalties on uncertain income tax positions as income tax expense.

See Note 6, Income Taxes, to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information.

Earnings Per Share
Basic earnings per share is computed by dividing the earnings attributable to common shares by the sum of the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding during the period and the weighted average number of stock-based awards that have vested but not yet been issued during the period. Diluted earnings per share reflects the potential dilution of securities that could share in the earnings. See Note 8, Earnings Per Share of Common Stock, to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information.

Cash and Cash Equivalents
Cash and cash equivalents include cash on hand and short-term investments that have maturities of three months or less when purchased. The Company has no restricted cash.

Receivables
We sell the vast majority of our products to select, pre-approved customers using customary trade terms that allow for payment in the future. Customer trade receivables and miscellaneous receivables, net of allowances for current expected credit losses, customer credits and warranties are reported in accounts and notes receivable on a net basis. Cash flows from the collection of receivables are classified as operating cash flows on the Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows.
We establish credit-worthiness prior to extending credit. We estimate the net of allowances for current expected credit losses of receivables each period. This estimate is based upon the current and forecasted economic conditions as well as an analysis of prior credit losses by receivable type. Account balances are charged off against the allowance when the potential for recovery is considered remote. We do not have any off-balance-sheet credit exposure related to our customers.

See Note 9, Accounts and Notes Receivable, to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information.

Inventories
U.S. inventories are valued at the lower of cost or market and cost is determined using the last-in, first-out ("LIFO") method of accounting. Non-U.S. inventories are valued at the lower of cost or net realizable value and cost is determined using the first-in, first-out ("FIFO") method of accounting. Additionally, inventory balances are adjusted for estimated obsolete or unmarketable inventory equal to the difference between the cost of inventory and its net realizable value or estimated market value, as applicable. See Note 10, Inventories, to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information.

Property Plant and Equipment
Property, plant and equipment is recorded at cost reduced by accumulated depreciation. Depreciation expense is recognized on a straight-line basis over assets’ estimated useful lives. Machinery and equipment includes manufacturing equipment (depreciated over 3 to 15 years), computer equipment (depreciated over 3 to 5 years) and office furniture and equipment (depreciated over 5 to 7 years). Within manufacturing equipment, assets that are subject to accelerated obsolescence or wear, such as tooling and engraving equipment, are depreciated over shorter periods (3 to 7 years). Heavy production equipment, such as conveyors, kilns and mixers, are depreciated over longer periods (10 to 15 years). Buildings are depreciated over 15 to 30 years, depending on factors such as type of construction and use. Computer software is amortized over 3 to 7 years.

Property, plant and equipment is tested for impairment when indicators of impairment exist, such as operating losses and/or negative cash flows. If an evaluation of the undiscounted future cash flows generated by an asset group indicates impairment, the asset group is written down to its estimated fair value, which is based on its discounted future cash flows. The principal assumption used in these impairment tests is future cash flows, which are derived from those used in our operating plan and strategic planning processes.

See Note 11, Property, Plant and Equipment, to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information.

Intangible Assets
Our indefinite-lived intangible assets are primarily trademarks which are integral to our corporate identity and expected to contribute indefinitely to our corporate cash flows. We conduct our annual impairment test for indefinite-lived intangible assets during the fourth quarter and we conduct interim impairment tests if indicators of potential impairment exist.

An impairment is recognized if the carrying amount of the asset exceeds its fair value. We first perform a qualitative assessment to determine if it is necessary to perform a quantitative impairment test. If a quantitative impairment test is deemed necessary, the method used to determine the fair value of our indefinite-lived intangible assets is the relief-from-royalty method. The principal assumptions used in our application of this method are revenue growth rate, discount rate and royalty rate. Revenue growth rates are derived from those used in our operating plan and strategic planning processes. The discount rate assumption is calculated based upon an estimated weighted average cost of capital, which we believe reflects the overall level of inherent risk and the rate of return a market participant would expect to achieve. The royalty rate assumption represents the estimated contribution of the intangible asset to overall profits. The method used for valuing our indefinite-lived intangible assets did not change from prior periods.
Our long-lived intangible assets are primarily contractual arrangements (amortized over 5 years), which includes non-compete agreements, and intellectual property (amortized over 2 to 15 years), which includes developed technology and patents. We review long-lived intangible assets for impairment if indicators of potential impairment exist, such as operating losses and/or negative cash flows. If an evaluation of the undiscounted future cash flows generated by the asset group indicates impairment, the asset group is written down to its estimated fair value, which is based on its discounted future cash flows. The principal assumption used in these impairment tests is future cash flows, which are derived from those used in our operating plan and strategic planning processes.

See Note 12, Intangible Assets, to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information.
Foreign Currency Transactions
For our subsidiaries with non-U.S. dollar functional currency, assets and liabilities are translated at period-end exchange rates. Revenues and expenses are translated at exchange rates effective during each month. Foreign currency translation gains or losses are included as a component of accumulated other comprehensive (loss) ("AOCI") within equity. Gains or losses on foreign currency transactions are recognized through net income (loss).

Stock-Based Employee Compensation
We issue stock-based compensation to certain employees and non-employee directors in different forms, including various types of performance-based share compensation including performance-based stock awards ("PSAs"), performance-based stock units ("PSUs"), performance-based restricted stock units ("PBRSUs"); and restricted stock units ("RSUs"). We record stock-based compensation expense based on an estimated grant-date fair value. The expense is reflected as a component of selling, general and administrative (“SG&A”) expenses on our Consolidated Statements of Operations. Stock-based compensation expense includes an estimate for forfeitures and anticipated achievement levels and is generally recognized on a straight-line basis over the vesting period for the entire award. See Note 4, Stock-based Compensation, to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information.

Leases
We lease certain real estate (warehouse and office space), vehicles and equipment. For leases with an initial term of one year or less we recognize lease expense for these leases on a straight-line basis over the lease term. Leases with an initial term of one year or more are recorded on the balance sheet. We consider all payments fixed unless there is a material impact to the balance sheet at any given time during the lease period.

We determine if a contract is a lease at inception. Operating leases are included in operating lease assets, accounts payable and accrued expenses and noncurrent operating lease liabilities in our consolidated balance sheets. Finance leases are included in property and equipment, current installments of long-term debt and long-term debt in our consolidated balance sheets.

Right-of-use ("ROU") assets represent our right to use an underlying asset for the lease term and lease liabilities represent our obligation to make lease payments arising from the lease. Operating lease ROU assets and liabilities are recognized at commencement date based on the present value of lease payments over the lease term. As most of our leases do not provide an implicit rate, we generally use our incremental borrowing rate based on the estimated rate of interest for collateralized borrowing over a similar term of the lease payments at commencement date. We update these rates annually. The operating lease ROU asset also includes any lease payments made and excludes lease incentives. Our lease terms may include options to extend or terminate the lease when it is reasonably certain with a compelling economic reason that we will exercise that option. Lease expense for lease payments is recognized on a straight-line basis over the lease term.

We have elected to combine lease and non-lease components as a single component and account for it as a lease for all asset classes with the exception of land and non-operating buildings. Lease and non-lease components of land and non-operating buildings are generally accounted for separately.

We have elected to use a portfolio approach to determine the discount rate and defined portfolio based on the geographic location of the asset by country and duration of the lease.

See Note 5, Leases, to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information.
Recently Adopted Accounting Standards
On January 1, 2020, we adopted Accounting Standards Update ("ASU") 2016-13, "Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments." The guidance requires immediate recognition of estimated credit losses that are expected to occur over the remaining life of many financial assets. The most notable impact of this ASU related to our processes around the assessment of the adequacy of our allowance for doubtful accounts on trade account receivables. We adopted using the modified retrospective transition method. The adoption of the standard did not have a material impact on our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.

On January 1, 2020, we adopted ASU 2018-13, "Disclosure Framework-Changes to the Disclosure Requirements for Fair Value Measurement." The guidance eliminates, adds and modifies certain disclosure requirements. Adoption of the standard did not have an impact our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.

On January 1, 2020, we adopted ASU 2018-14, "Disclosure Framework-Changes to the Disclosure Requirements for Defined Benefit Plans." The guidance changes the disclosure requirements by eliminating certain disclosures that are no longer considered cost beneficial and added new ones that are considered pertinent. Adoption of the standard did not have an impact our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.

On January 1, 2020, we adopted ASU 2018-15, "Customer's Accounting for Implementation Costs Incurred in a Cloud Computing Arrangement That Is a Service Contract." The guidance aligns the requirements for capitalizing implementation costs in a cloud computing arrangement service contract with the requirements for capitalizing implementation costs incurred for an internal use software license. Capitalized implementation costs should be amortized over the term of the service agreement on a straight line basis and should be assessed for impairment in a manner similar to long-lived assets. We adopted using the prospective transition method. This standard did not have a material impact on our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.

On January 1, 2019, we adopted ASU 2016-02, "Leases." The guidance, and subsequent amendments issued, requires a lessee to recognize the assets and liabilities that arise from a lease agreement. Specifically, this new guidance requires lessees to recognize a liability to make lease payments and a ROU asset representing its right to use the underlying asset for the lease term, with limited exceptions. Adoption of the new standard resulted in the recording of lease assets and lease liabilities of $9.2 million as of January 1, 2019 and the adoption is not expected to have a significant impact on the Company's Consolidated Financial Statements.

On January 1, 2018, we adopted ASU 2014-09, "Revenue from Contracts with Customers" and all the related amendments. The impact of the standard is limited to our accounting for warranties and returns. We adopted the standard using the modified retrospective transition method and we recorded a cumulative catch up adjustment as of January 1, 2018 to increase accumulated deficit in the amount of $4.1 million, increase prepaid expenses and other current assets by $0.4 million and decrease accounts receivable, net by $4.5 million. The adoption of the standard did not have a material impact on our results of operations or cash flows, but did result in new disclosures.

Recently Issued Accounting Standards
In December 2019, the FASB issued ASU 2019-12, "Income Taxes (Topic 740): Simplifying the Accounting for Income Taxes" This new standard eliminates certain exceptions in ASC 740 related to the approach for intraperiod tax allocation, the methodology for calculating income taxes in an interim period, guidance on accounting for franchise taxes and the recognition of deferred tax liabilities for outside basis differences. It also clarifies and simplifies other aspects of the accounting for income taxes. This standard is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2020. We will adopt ASU 2019-12 as of January 1, 2021 and the adoption is not expected to have a significant impact on our consolidated financial statements.     

Subsequent Events
We have evaluated all activity of the Company and concluded that subsequent events are properly reflected in the Company's Consolidated Financial Statements and Notes as required by U.S. GAAP. See Note 20, Subsequent Events, to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information.